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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 180 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington. mr. vice predent, thank you very mu for taking time to see us for this conversation. how's your health? >> much, much bet, thank you. i had lived with coronary artery disease since i was 37 years old 1978. had six heart attacks and nearly everything else that you could do yourself. i had an episode of ventricular fibrillation, my heart stopped. my life was saved by an implanted defibrillator. so i've been through a lot a as of last march i got a transplant, got a new heart and it's nothing short of a miracle. it's like taking 30 years off your life. >> rose: some people said to me without that heart transplant your days were numbered. did you have sense of that? >> oh, absolutely. i'd gotten to the point where i'd done bypass and all the various procedures and i got to end stage heart failure, your heart is just no longer moving enough blood to service your vital organs and this was in july of 2010 so i went in for planned surgery. they had to do it on arch emergency basis because everything started to collapse rapidly. and that's when we implanted this -- it's called a left ven
york times" on syria and whether the president may be reconsidering the use of american weapons supplied to the rebels. the concern president obama had lying weapons would in effect be involved in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some ki
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going to have parts of our community succeed and parts fail. if government fails, we all fail. >> we don't trust government. but we need government. and government is us, when you come right down to it. those folks in washington weren't landed there from mars. they were elected by us. >> it's a complex problem. people want quick answersment but the fact is that there aren't quick answers. >> these aren't things that can be fixed in election cycle. and the question is do we have the political leadership that is willing to invest that way. >> rational thinking leads to one thing, conclusions. and conclusions are not going to solve the debt problem. emotions on the other hand leads to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and
with fairly illustrious people. so with the university magazine we used to chuck around. we would see all these well-known people and then write about them it was sort of my first entree into that world and i loved it. >> loved journalism. >> yes, absolutely. because every, this little magazine appeared fort nightly and every fort night we had 32 pages which we didn't know what to do with except we had four pages of advertising from a chain called mother care. whose owner very kindly took care of the sort of rinky dink financial side of this magazine and we had to fill it up with editorial copies. >> what made you decide to go to the united states. >> i had one of these weird coincidences of life. there was a gentleman who, is today unknown in america and isn't very well-known in britain any more because he died some years ago. but his name was bill deeds. and he wased editor of the daily telegraph newspaper. and he was a giant in british journalism. he had been the character on which evelyn war had rested his novel scoop. and i went to see him to apply for a job on feet street. after, fo
. >> rose: in less than four days $85 billion in aubling spending cuts will begin to ripple through the u.s. economy. the impact will be felt across society from education, to medical care to national defense. the sequester deadline imposed in the summer of 2011 was intended to sharpern the government's focus on the fat debt. president obama pushed for a last minute compromise to lessen the economic damage. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured the uncertainty is already having an effect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> these cut does not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> rose: steve rattner has had a distinguished career in journalism, business and government, instrumental in turning around the automobile industry, and currently chairman of advisors and the economic analyst for msnbc's morning joses and a regular contributer to the "new york times" and financial times. so
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and what choices they pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futuri
and extraordinary. tell me how you came to this book and what you hope for to us understanding about the future. >> well, thank you, charlie. you play a unique role in our country, i'm not buttering him up when i say i know you'll agreement i think you're the bester int interviewer that we have in our country, it's great to be with you. (applause) >> and i have thereby ruined every other interview that i will do for this book, i'm sure. i can't-- but thank you for all those kind words. and thank you all for coming. it's great to be back at the 92nd street y. i want to give a shout out to all of the folks at jccs around the country and those on the stair masters upstairs who are watching on the screen. i've always been fascinating by those who try to interpret the evidence compiled by expert communities that have relevance to our common future and i've focused on that in my ca reeferment i did that on climate in the digital world. about eight years ago i went to a conference in switzerland and somebody kd me what are the drivers of global change and i gave an answer, if you were asked you could
's a service and useful and i think that's what we do. >> rose: benh zeitlin and allen pizzey when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: benh zeitlin is here. when he made his direct orial debut "beast of the southern wild" last year it became a movie everybody is talking b the story of hush puppie a 9-year-old girl faced with the illness of her father. it became the runnaway hit of lastr's film festival skirt winning awards at sundance and at cannes and now nominated for four academy awards including best director and best picture. here is the trailer of beasts of the southern wild. >> the whole universe depends on everything fitting together just right. if one piece busts, even the smallest pie, the entire universe -- >> this here is an auroch, a fierce creature. >> the storm's coming. >> the you all better learn how to survive. >> it is pie job to take care of you, okay? >> all was iet goes hine my eyes,
. no one liked it at first. that allowed us to focus on fixing the fundamentals of the business which have now turned beautifully. >> charlie: as you led those conversations, what was your definition of what you wanted ebay to be? >> well, ebay's purpose has never really changed. our ebay founder said he measures success by positively impacting hundreds of millions of people's lives around the world and connecting them through trade. and so what we needed to do was to update that into today's internet and tomorrow's. for instance, one of the key bets we made very early on was on mobile. we saw that mobile technology was going to be a profound force in people's lives. so we bet early on mobile and we bet hard. >> charlie: what did you see about mobile and what year are we talking'? >> we first started in 2008 end of 2008 early 2009 we saw that the smart phone was changing how people behaved. >> charlie: here's the interesting thing. it didn't seem that way necessarily for everybody because everybody would have done it. if we now look back it seems obvious even in 2008 that smart phones woul
, the response and the work ahead. >> i thought like many of us americans today that our new president coming in 2009 looked like a great communicator. he was eloquent. he was a role model. he spoke and he understood. it's not like he was not really understanding what was going on. he understood. but he gave very, very few speeches. only one really major one. on the financial crisis. explaining what in the world happened to us. what are we going to do about it? why does that make sense? and hang on, folks, this is going to take a while. >> charlie: john done a hoe and alan blinder next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: john done a hoe is here. he became ceo of ebay in march of 2008 but he is not a founder of ceo like zucker man, page. he rose to the ranks before moving to ebay. under his leadership ebay has gone from strength to strength including a 75% rally in share price. the company started off as a
? >> sh--she used a professional name when she was working. [sobs softly] she became ill, and she lost her looks because of me. >> but you were only 8 at the time. >> it doesn't matter. [tearfully] she lost her looks, and she died because of me. >> what was her name, john? >> [stutters] tammie. >> can i give you a lift, sir? >> no, thanks. joyce is driving out here. she'll pick me up. >> right. >> what's that? >> i suppose i may as well dump it. >> what is it? >> it was that present i bought for jay. >> oh. >> she didn't want it. i don't think she's over her last relationship. >> lord byron, "selected poems." >> yeah. she had this tatty old book in her house. so i thought i'd buy her a new one. she marked that page in particular. it must be her favorite. >> "so we'll go no more a-roving so late into the night, though the heart be still as loving, and the moon be still as bright." are you? born in a prison... man: who's that young girl? little dorrit? oh, she's nothing. surrounded by secrets... man: there is one thing i should like to ask you. woman: have a care what you wish for. from the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 180 (some duplicates have been removed)

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